Saturday, July 25, 2015

UPDATE: The streets of New York are not a healthy place for young alligators

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by Ken

Even by the time my little piece appeared here last night, there was a sad sequel. It seemed a harmless enough little story: a small alligator observed making its way along Ninth Avenue at 205th Street in Northern Manhattan's Inwood neighborhood. We thought we left the poor creature safely in the custody of the NYPD, but further developments developed, as I learned from this pass-along from Noah, who keeps track of these things. The cops did their part, but it was to no avail.
Alligator found in upper Manhattan has died, but cause of death is a mystery

by Lisa L. Colangelo / New York Daily News
Published: Friday, July 24, 2015, 11:54 AM
Updated: Saturday, July 25, 2015, 11:40 AM

The alligator found wandering the streets of upper Manhattan couldn’t make it in the big city.

The 3-foot-long creature was spotted trying to cross Ninth Ave. at W. 205th Street in Inwood on Thursday afternoon, and instantly became a curiosity. But it died on Friday before it could be moved to a wildlife sanctuary.

It is unknown whether the gator was a pet that escaped or was dumped by its owner. Officials also aren’t sure whether it had been hurt while out on the street, or exactly why it died.

The animal, which is illegal to own in New York City, was brought to New York Animal Care Centers by police.

Staffers said they placed the gator in an aquarium type setting with a small shallow pool of water along with a supplemental heat source.

Before the alligator died, the caregivers gave it a name of CockadoodleQ.

“Reptiles are very good at masquerading and hiding illnesses and injury,” said Sean Casey, an animal rescuer and reptile expert. “In their world, once you show a weakness, you are food for something else."

Casey, who is based in Brooklyn, said people are enchanted by tiny alligators only to lose interest as they grow.

“There is this misconception that zoos will take them,” he said. “They can't be released. They can't be let go. It's really sad.”

The alligator found wandering the streets of upper Manhattan couldn’t make it in the big city.

The 3-foot-long creature was spotted trying to cross Ninth Ave. at W. 205th Street in Inwood on Thursday afternoon, and instantly became a curiosity. But it died on Friday before it could be moved to a wildlife sanctuary.

It is unknown whether the gator was a pet that escaped or was dumped by its owner. Officials also aren’t sure whether it had been hurt while out on the street, or exactly why it died.

The animal, which is illegal to own in New York City, was brought to New York Animal Care Centers by police.

Staffers said they placed the gator in an aquarium type setting with a small shallow pool of water along with a supplemental heat source.

Before the alligator died, the caregivers gave it a name of CockadoodleQ.

“Reptiles are very good at masquerading and hiding illnesses and injury,” said Sean Casey, an animal rescuer and reptile expert. “In their world, once you show a weakness, you are food for something else."

Casey, who is based in Brooklyn, said people are enchanted by tiny alligators only to lose interest as they grow.

“There is this misconception that zoos will take them,” he said. “They can't be released. They can't be let go. It's really sad.”
I might add that I am not, shall we say, a fan of alligators. (Not that they need my approval.) I am especially not a fan of alligators on the streets of Inwood. But that's the thing -- this poor creature didn't get there on its own. It didn't deserve that fate.
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1 Comments:

At 4:12 PM, Blogger Illsa Gorrey said...

Wild animals should not be kept as pets. Poor gator.
Thanks for sharing the story.

 

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