Thursday, October 08, 2015

San Franciscans Formalize Coalition To Reclaim Their City


-by Denise Sullivan

"For those of us who are progressive, who believe the City of San Francisco should work for everyone, it's a difficult time to be at City Hall…it's a difficult time to be in that building," said Supervisor David Campos, last weekend as he helped to launch Vision SF, a grassroots group primed to reclaim San Francisco from the forces of greed, corruption and narcissism that have poisoned municipal waters.

Representing the Mission, the City's Latino cultural district and locus of its housing crisis, Supervisor Campos brought the additional dimension of the broken immigration system to the event conceived as a pre-election housing initiative forum. Referring to Donald Trump scapegoating immigrants following a recent murder committed by an undocumented person here, Campos cleaved to San Francisco's sanctuary city policy and pressed to keep local law enforcement out of the business of immigration. "Our sanctuary policy already says we're not going to tolerate criminal activity," underscores Campos "No human being is illegal and every human being regardless of immigration status has human dignity."

Intended to rally grassroots community organizations and free range citizens and spur them into a cohesive voting block for this election, there wasn't much talk of San Francisco's homeless population, though the ballot's housing initiatives perhaps imply a way toward that solution too. Propositions A, F, I, J and K concern affordable housing, regulating Airbnb, pausing development of market-rate housing, protecting legacy businesses and using city-owned surplus land respectively---and were elaborated on by the Housing Rights Committee's Sara Shortt, former assemblyman and supervisor Tom Ammiano, lifelong human rights advocate Cleve Jones and artist Roberto Hernandez (who learned to organize directly from Cesar Chavez). The activists were joined by committed singer-songwriter Tom Heyman, young filmmakers Joe Talbot and Jimmie Fails, and comedian Mike Evans, among others. A clip of Alexandra Pelosi's new film, San Francisco 2.0, was to be screened but Vision-SF co-founder David Talbot announced that venture capitalist Ron Conway succeeded in scaring HBO and the filmmaker's family from showing the film and attending the event (not exactly a good portent for the region that sparked the Free Speech movement).

Talbot and co-host, former supervisor and housing rights activist Christina Olague presided over the program that generally advocated coalition building across racial, age, and economic lines. Addressing the need to include young, exploited tech workers in the movement for economic and housing justice, Cleve Jones invoked the name of his friend Harvey Milk which brought the crowd to a eerie hush. "It's over," Jones remembered, as he recalled the moment of seeing the slain body of Milk being removed from City Hall, "All I could think was, "it's over'," he said. Though as night fell and the streets filled with San Franciscans from all walks of life, candles lit to mourn the fallen at the evening's march and vigil in 1978, Jones found a way to be inspired to push forward. "This is just the beginning," he said, and it was that message he impressed on the crowd who left with house signs and renewed spirit of solidarity.

Meanwhile, across town, thousands of San Franciscans and tourists reveled in Golden Gate Park while musicians, many with counter-culture roots of their own, entertained at the annual three-day music festival sponsored by deceased private equity investor, Warren Hellman. Mega-producer T Bone Burnett used his stage time to speak truth to power: "Who's going to call this darkness, darkness. Somebody's got to locate the bomb, dot com." The founders and members of Vision-SF are trying, man, but they're going to need a lotta help from their friends.

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